Salt and Vinegar Potato Hash

Salt and Vinegar Potato Hash // Notwithoutsalt.com

My favorite weekends are the ones with no plans. The Saturday mornings where you linger in bed until the desire for coffee outweighs the desire to stay curled up under the weight of the blankets. Now that the kids are a bit older we have that sort of luxury; to linger in bed, slowly sip a full cup of coffee while maybe even reading an entire article in The New Yorker. These are the things my dreams are made of.

When the first cup of coffee has reached the critical last few sips and the kids are bemoaning over their hunger that’s when I’ll start to think about what’s for breakfast. And since we’re talking about the weekend of my dreams let’s talk about the breakfast of my dreams – because while I believe that vinegar runs through my veins, Gabe, on the other hand, leaves the room when he sees me reaching for the bottle. My hope of ever starting my own pickle business are quickly put to rest when my husband gets one sniff. It’s not that he doesn’t like vinegar, I mean he married me, at this point he’s well acquainted with the fact that my vinaigrettes make the toughest person pucker. He just doesn’t like it as much as I do.

This potato hash dish of sorts turns one of my favorite flavors into a perfectly acceptable way to start the day. By boiling the potatoes in a diluted pickling solution, the vinegar flavor runs deep. The bright zip is reinforced in the end with a fresh splash of vinegar. These potatoes are adapted from a Bon Appétit recipe and on their own they’d be lovely alongside a roast chicken or a grilled steak but here I crisp up some bacon in their presence, tuck in a few eggs, scatter some scallions and call it breakfast. The next weekend you find yourself in with no plans I think you too should call it your breakfast.

Salt and Vinegar Potato Hash // Notwithoutsalt.com Salt and Vinegar Potato Hash // Notwithoutsalt.com

 

 

Salt and Vinegar Potato Hash

2 pounds fingerling or baby Yukon Gold potatoes

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon salt, plus more for finishing

4 strips bacon cut into 1/4-inch strips

4 eggs

3 scallions, thinly slices

Freshly ground black pepper

Place the potatoes in a medium sauce pan. Add the vinegar, salt, and water to cover the potatoes by 1-inch. Bring the pot to a boil then reduce to a simmer. Cook until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Drain the water then let the potatoes cool.

When the potatoes are cool enough to handle slice them in half.

Preheat your oven to 350°F

In a large skillet (preferably cast iron) set over medium high heat add the bacon and cook until crisp. Add a splash of oil if there’s less than about 2 tablespoons bacon fat in the skillet then carefully add the potatoes and cook until crisp and golden. Turn off the heat, stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons vinegar, then nudge the potatoes to create four little nests for the eggs to rest. Crack the eggs into the pockets, sprinkle a pinch of salt over each one then slide the pan into the oven and cook until the egg white is just set. This will take about 5 to 7 minutes. Watch closely to avoid a firm yolk because what’s breakfast without a golden yellow runny yolk?

Finish with a pinch of flake salt, thinly sliced scallions, and black pepper. If you’re like me you’ll also serve this with hot sauce, particularly one with a good bit of vinegar in it.

  • 13 Comments /
  • Permalink

Peanut Butter Rice Krispie Treat Cake

PB Krispie Treat Cake // Notwithoutsalt.com

He’s 10 years old. I’ve been a mom for an entire decade. I have to type that and repeat it over and over in my head in order to believe it.

When he was born I knew the sort of mom I wanted to be. I prepped my shoulder for him to cry on, I bought heaps of felt for all the craft projects we were going to do. The glitter and glue guns were at the ready. He was going to be able to prepare a complete meal by the time we was five because he would join me in the kitchen every evening as I prepped dinner. I would read to him every night, be in his classroom every week, play on the floor with him every day. And then reality hit and I did some of those things sometimes but I constantly failed to live up to the expectation I put on the mom I wanted to be.

Then I stopped being her and started being me.

I set aside those expectations of what I thought motherhood was going to be and leaned into what it actually is and how I fit into that. What once I saw as my “failures” became simply a sign of my humanity. And, as you saw in the conversation from last week’s post – I started to take note of the things I was doing right rather than constantly sitting in the muck of how I thought I was messing it all up. You know what happened when I freed myself up enough to say, “hey, this was actually a pretty great mom thing you just did there!” The floodgates of my parenting thumbs up opened wide and suddenly I was able to go through my days and say to myself, “that was good!” “Nice work on that conversation!” “You played catch with him for 30 minutes? I mean, you’re pretty much a saint.” And then sometimes there was, “yikes, did you really need to say that?” And in that moment I remind myself that I’m not perfect, I make mistakes, I own up to them, apologize and we can move on.

PB Krispie Treat Cake // Notwithoutsalt.com PB Krispie Treat Cake // Notwithoutsalt.com PB Krispie Treat Cake // Notwithoutsalt.com

Ten years in and I still have a lot to learn but I’m so happy to be here, parenting in a way that fits me, and loving on my boy who is becoming more himself each and every day.

This “cake” of sorts was made at his request. It’s been a go-to for birthdays over the last couple of years and every time it’s requested I get just as eager to eat it as they do. He may not quite know how to prepare an entire meal yet (although his scrambled eggs are perfectly fluffy) he does know the value of brown butter and that’s how we start this cake. The other secret to this towering cereal treat is a good bit of salt to offset the inevitable sweetness that comes when marshmallows are the glue and a frosting that leans more towards bitter than sweet.

Happy birthday, buddy. Thanks for making me a mom and helping me figure out what that even means.

PB Krispie Treat Cake // Notwithoutsalt.com

Peanut Butter Rice Krispie Treat Cake

Serves 10 – 12

1 cup / 2 sticks butter

2 10 ounce bags marshmallows

8 ounces / 1 cup peanut butter

13 – 14 cups / 1 pound Rice Krispies

Sea salt or flake salt

1 pound chopped, bittersweet chocolate

2 cups / 1 pound sour cream

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

For the peanut butter rice krispie cake: Butter and line three 8-inch round cake pans with parchment paper. Butter the parchment paper as well then set those aside.

In a large sauce pan melt the butter. Continue to melt until bubbly and it starts to foam. As the bubbles subside you will notice little brown bits on the bottom of the pan and the butter smells nutty. Turn off the heat then add the marshmallows. Stir until the marshmallows are completely melted.

Stir in the peanut butter.

Add the Rice Krispie cereal to a very large bowl. Seriously, big. If you don’t have a big enough bowl I suggest mixing this in two batches.

Pour the butter/mallow mixture over the Rice Krispies then stir well to combine. It takes a good bit of stirring but eventually all will be well coated. Sprinkle in a teaspoon or so of flake salt or 1/2 teaspoon sea salt.

Divide the mixture evenly between the three pans. Press them down firmly then set aside for a couple of hours to firm up.

I like to add a bit more flake salt to the top of the layers.

For the frosting: Melt the chocolate over a double boiler. Remove the bowl from the heat and stir in the sour cream. Carefully stir in the powdered sugar until well combined. Add the salt.

You can use the frosting right away or set aside for later. If it gets too firm simply melt over a double boiler and stir until it reaches the desired consistency.

Spread the frosting between the layers and on the top of the cake.

Finish with sprinkles – or a bit more flake salt.

  • 22 Comments /
  • Permalink