Intro

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You better believe me when I tell you that you have just found the last Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe you will ever need. I know. I am not the first person to claim this weighty statement. After all, it wasn’t that long ago that this recipe was spreading as quickly as that nasty stomach virus that infected our entire family over Christmas.

In actuality everyone’s definition of the perfect chocolate chip cookie is different. Asking 20 people what qualities define their perfect cookie and I am sure you are going to get as many different responses. I will say however that I have converted many followers to my recipe. In fact, just recently I was told that I had ruined someone from ever eating another cookie that wasn’t this one. And for that I am not sorry and I am not surprised.

My perfect cookie is varied in texture. The exterior rim, the color of golden brown sugar, is perfectly crisp. Beyond the crunch there lies varying levels of chewy gooey-ness. I remove the cookies from the oven just when the edges start to brown. People think I’m crazy and question my timing as the cookies appear under baked. But I assure them that I am a professional I have done this thousands of times. The cookies continue to bake on the tray and as they cool the gooey center transforms to a perfectly chewy interior. Cookie eaters question no longer.

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updated photo

The dough, although perfectly flavored with salt and a high proportion of brown sugar, exists to hold the chunks of chocolate in place. That’s right I said chunks and not chips. The funny, (more sad than funny) thing about chocolate chips is that they are filled with substance similar to wax. I don’t know about you but I don’t really enjoy eating wax. The reason for the wax in the chips is so that they do not melt – they hold their shape, which is quite cute but I’ll take taste over cuteness any day. Using couverture (fancy name for quality chocolate that is used for coating truffles and such) allows the chocolate to melt and pool. If you were to break these cookies in half you would see layers of chocolate and dough – similar to the layers in puff pastry, and you all know how crazy I am about those layers.

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Look how much Roman loves cookies (actually he wasn’t eating the cookies he just always looks that happy)

I use large chunks of bittersweet chocolate, lots of brown sugar, a touch of Turbinado sugar, and sprinkle of  salt on top – making these this the last chocolate chip cookie recipe you will ever need.

 

THE Chocolate Chip Cookie
8 oz.         2 sticks butter
2 oz          1/4 cup white sugar
2 oz          1/4 cup Turbinado sugar
12 oz        1 3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
2  eggs
1/4 oz       2 tsp vanilla
1 lb.          3 1/2 cup All Purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp Baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
1 lb. chocolate (use the best quality chocolate you can afford. With a serrated knife cut chocolate chunks roughly 1/2 inch)
Cream the butter and the sugars until light. Scrape down the side of the bowl. Continue mixing while adding the eggs one at time. Make sure each egg is incorporated before adding the next. Add the vanilla. Scrape down the bowl with a spatula. Combine the flour, soda and salt in another bowl. With a whisk, stir to combine. With the machine on low, slowly add the flour. Mix until just combined, taking care not to over mix. With a spatula fold in the chocolate.
If you so choose, and I do recommend that you do, sprinkle a very fine dusting of good quality sea salt. Fleur de Sel or Murray River Pink Salt are my recommendations.
Bake at 360* for 12 minutes. They should be lightly golden on the outside but still look gooey on the inside.
 

THE Chocolate Chip Cookie

 

2 sticks butter (8 oz)

1/4 cup white sugar (2 oz )

1/4 cup Turbinado sugar (2 oz )

1 3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed (12 oz )

2  eggs

2 tsp vanilla (1/4 oz)

3 1/2 cup All Purpose flour (1 lb. )

1 1/2 tsp Baking soda

3/4 tsp salt

1 lb. chocolate (use the best quality chocolate you can afford. With a serrated knife cut chocolate chunks roughly 1/2 inch)

1/2 teaspoon good quality salt, for sprinkling on top before baking

Cream the butter and the sugars until very light and fluffy, about 5 minutes on medium high. Scrape down the side of the bowl. Continue mixing while adding the eggs one at time. Make sure each egg is incorporated before adding the next. Add the vanilla. Scrape down the bowl with a spatula. Combine the flour, soda and salt in another bowl. With a whisk to combine. With the machine on low, slowly add the flour. Mix until just combined, taking care not to over mix. With a spatula fold in the chocolate.

If you so choose, and I do recommend that you do, sprinkle a very fine dusting of good quality sea salt. Fleur de Sel or Murray River Pink Salt are my recommendations.

Bake at 360* for 12 minutes. They should be lightly golden on the outside but still look gooey on the inside.

 

212 Responses to “the last chocolate chip cookie…”

  1. Mona

    I have literally been using this recipe forever! After a long search of the “perfect” cookie recipe, misuse of baking soda/powder, and a lot of wasted chocolate, I have found the one that suits my cravings and my family’s! Thank you :)

    Reply
  2. Sol

    I just made cookies will all Turbinado sugar (no white no brown) and they were so good that I searched to see if anyone else had thought of using Turbinado, and of course someone did! The Turbinado sugar seems to enhance to the texture with the large crystals adding a little crunch and dissolving in your mouth after each bite. The cookies have to be baked more carefully and watched more closely than a standard recipe I’m used to. I had to experiment to figure out the exact time or they came out too gooey or too hard – with only half a minute making a big different. I think mixing the sugars like you did is really smart and I’m gong to try that next time.

    Reply
  3. Kay

    I keep reading the key to a successful chocolate chip cookie is refrigerating the dough for at least 24 hours. do you think that’s not necessary? just curious! thanks so much!!

    Reply
  4. Jennifer hill

    I can’t wait to try these, I’m an avid baker & always looking for something better! I’ve never used turbinado sugar! I’m wondering if you can help me.. I’ve been searching & searching for years trying to find the perfect sugar cookie! The ones GMA use to make.. Big & fluffy soft, rising very high in the center… Do you know what I mean??

    Reply
  5. Diana W

    I’m about to lose my mind here. I’ve made this recipe over a dozen times in the past few years, each time with great success. However, the last 2 times I’ve made it, the cookies have turned out flatter than pancakes and I can’t figure out why. Baking soda and flour are new. I refrigerate the dough into logs, and slice and bake them the next day. Any ideas? They still taste good but are just so flat and its driving me crazy, and i feel like I’m wasting ingredients with each batch.

    Reply
    • Ashley Rodriguez

      Diana that is so strange. Hmm. In the past did you refrigerate the dough? When you bake them right away they are puffier than when you bake them after a good chill in the refrigerator. Also, if you scoop them they bake puffier than if you slice and bake. Also, the temperature of your butter really affects the final thickness of the cookie. It should be just room temperature – not too soft.

      Reply
      • Diana W

        Thanks, Ashley. I think I figured it out, my oven takes longer to preheat than the timer would indicate. So I was putting them in at what I thought was 360F, but after getting an oven thermometer, I saw that it was still only at 300F. Took another 10+ minutes to get to the right temp. Made a batch of your peppermint white chocolate chip cookies over the weekend and they turned out great!

        Reply
  6. rach

    Have you ever flash frozen the individual, raw scoops of cookie dough and then baked at a later date?

    Reply
  7. Shannon

    Without a doubt the best chocolate chip cookies I have ever made! Perfection!

    Reply
  8. SOMMER

    I am extremely limited on time…I wonder if you could put these in a pan and make a “bar” cookie instead? Would you suggest I change anything?

    Reply
  9. Wendy

    So I’m a professional baker and chocolatier (not a blogger though), and I’ve made more variations on chocolate chip cookies than I can count – but hadn’t seen this one. Made a batch today, but only had time to refrigerate for 6 hours, and chose to omit the sprinkle of salt (for these particular taste testers). I chose to use Ghirardelli bittersweet chocolate so as to not overwhelm the flavor of the cookie itself. These are SPECTACULAR cookies. I think I’d like to try them with a sprinkle of Vanilla Salt when I offer them at farmers’ markets since I like them better than the ones I was offering (which were pretty spectacular too)!

    Reply
  10. Mignon

    I just read the interview, then saw the recipe for The Chocolate Chip Cookie. After reading other comments, I noticed that unsalted butter should be used, also at room temperature (not stated in your recipe) but, what size scoop should be used and approximately how many cookies does this recipe make?

    Reply
  11. Dipa

    Hi! Love the photographs n your description!!! Plan to trying but wanted to know if there are any substitute for eggs? Some in the family don’t eat or are allergic.
    Thanks :)

    Reply
      • Amanda

        Thanks!! I love these and they’re always a hit. The weird thing I noticed is that when I used dark chocolate as opposed to the milk chocolate I usually use, the cookies seemed to harden as they cooled and the milk chocolate ones didn’t do that. Unless I did something wrong when making the batch this time.

        Reply
        • Ashley Rodriguez

          Dark chocolate has more solids – such as cocoa butter and contains no dairy so I can understand why they would be harder with dark chocolate. Milk chocolate always maintains some sort of softness but that’s so interesting. I think I’ve only ever used dark chocolate as that is my preference. I’ll have to do some experimenting. You could try underbaking the dark chocolate ones to try to mimic the texture with the milk chocolate variety.

          Reply
          • Lisa Anderson

            I like to do a mix of Semi-sweet and Milk (approx 1/3 of volume needed is Milk, the rest SS) when I make these. Yes, the Dark (ss chocolate) doesn’t melt like the Milk Chocolate but I do think that using semi-sweet will yield a softer chocolate than a darker chocolate does.

  12. Amanda

    Oh, the dark chocolate melts beautifully! It’s the actual cookie itself that seems to get crispy. But it’s possible that my oven has gotten hotter – I’ll try pulling them out at 10 minutes (I already did 11 and they were still a little too hard).

    Reply

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