Intro

Hot Ginger Toddy // Not Without Salt

It’s interesting to me how we all respond differently to recipes. For me there’s a physical reaction when I come across a recipe that I can’t wait to try. Something inside me jumps as if to say, “yes!” I’ll respond by creasing the corner of the page to remind myself to head right to that recipe the next time I pick up the book. Sometimes, and I love this when it happens, I’m so inspired by a recipe I’ll tuck the book under my arm and carry it with me right into the kitchen and immediately get started. For this reason butter always sits on the counter at the ready in case a perfectly softened stick is needed and my excitement can’t bear to wait.

Three words, “hot ginger tea” was all it took to get me straight into the kitchen. The other motivator could have been the fact that I immediately imagined this spicy tea with a splash of bourbon to transform the tea to a toddy and with that our evening’s cocktail was made.

The original recipe comes from David Tanis’ new book, One Good Dish. The book is filled with simple, inspiring and beautiful food. This recipe acts more of a guide and has only four ingredients, including the water. It’s tea in its most basic form. Sliced ginger; woody and hot, dance around a pot of boiling water until the water is deeply spiced. A bit of honey swirls in the pot to sweeten the mix and then for me – a lot of lemon. One its own it is the perfect tea for soothing, warming and healing the sickness that is rampant this time of year. With a splash of bourbon it warms more thoroughly, is suddenly festive and becomes the perfect accessory for drinking on the couch right next to the Christmas tree.

Hot Ginger Toddy // Not Without Salt Hot Ginger Toddy // Not Without Salt

Before you head right into the kitchen I have a few things to tell you about. First of all, my husband and I are teaching a 2-day Food Photography workshop at Aran’s (Cannelle et Vanille) beautiful new studio. It’s just a few blocks away from Pike Place so we will spend some time shopping and shooting there. I’ll take you to a few of my favorite places in the market and we’ll gather some supplies for shooting and eating. I will walk you through my process, we’ll talk about editing, lighting (natural and inexpensive ways to shoot with artificial light) and Gabe – who is the tech genius – will be there to explain technical things better than I can. Where I tend to focus on composition and emotion, he balances me with his numbers and ability to explain things without using my Ritz cracker illustration which no one seems to ever get. The perfect team. I’d love to see you there! You can purchase the workshop here.

Next thing. I’m speaking at The Big Traveling Potluck!! I’m so honored to have been asked and I can’t wait to spend the weekend with many of you. Check out the line up – some of my favorite people will be there.

And finally, (this one gives me butterflies) I’m opening up a pop-up shop this Sunday (12/22) from 2-4 pm! The best slice and bake cookies you can imagine (chocolate chip with sea salt and white chocolate peppermint with vanilla salt) will be available. Right now I’m getting pounds and pounds of Valrhona chocolate and enough butter to make me happy for quite a while. Each package of dough will easily make 1 dozen cookies – enough for you AND Santa. If you are still looking for the perfect hostess gift, this is it. Come by early to make sure you snag yours! You’ll find me and my cookie dough at 1405 NW 70th St 98117 on Sunday. For those of you who aren’t in Seattle, be patient. I’m thinking about how I can get dough to you in 2014.

Hot Ginger Toddy // Not Without Salt

 

 

Hot Ginger Toddy

Recipe from, One Good Dish by David Tanis

Serves 4- 6

4 cups water

3-inch piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons honey

lemon

bourbon

 

In a small saucepan bring the water and ginger to a boil. Reduce the heat then simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the honey, taste and add more if you’d like.

Strain out the ginger. Pour 6 ounces or so in a cup, add 1/2 – 1 ounce of bourbon to the cup and finish with a good squeeze of lemon. Taste and add more bourbon or lemon. Garnish with a piece of lemon and enjoy while warm.

The tea keeps covered in the fridge for 2 weeks.

29 Responses to “Hot Ginger Toddy”

  1. Lisa Gordon

    It’s so unfair. I’m in LA and I want the dough…… So so unfair…. I’ll go comfort myself with the ginger toddy right now…

    Reply
  2. Kat

    Looks delicious and I wish I could try right now. Maybe next winter when I’m not pregnant anymore! Just a small note, it’s “bear to wait,” not bare. Sorry, I’m a bit of a grammar addict. :)

    Reply
  3. Brenda

    Let’s just say bourbon is our favorite and we currently have 4 to choose from. It’s a good week.

    Reply
  4. Mamen

    I know what you mean about seeing a recipe you like. When it happens to me, I start making the list of all ingredients I need and I look for a day during that week that I would be able to try it :) I am a relly foodie person , what can I say!?
    This tea it is really something that I would like to try so you can imagine what I am doing now…

    Have a nice day!

    Reply
  5. Megan

    So simple and lovely. I am always looking for winter adult drinks that aren’t loaded with a bunch of sugar. I’m going to make this Christmas Eve! Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Abby W

    Balthazar in NYC has a similar delicious Citrus Ginger Tea and they add some mint as well. It’s a nice touch if you have some on hand next time!

    Reply
  7. felicia | Dish by Dish

    ashley, i do what you do too, but instead of a book, it’s usually my kindle tucked under my arm as I head to the kitchen and rummage the remains of my pantry. if there are ingredients on the list that are missing from my pantry, i try to see if there are substitutes I can use, if not, i head to the supermarket three blocks away and buy them! Some recipes just pop up at you too much to be tucked away for another time!

    wish i could go for your food photography workshop (unfortunately it would be too expensive to fly from Buenos Aires to Aran’s studio).

    have a great Christmas & New Year’s!
    love,
    felicia

    Reply
  8. Giulia

    Oh, I wish I could go to the traveling potluck – but it’s my husband’s birthday and I don’t like to leave when birthdays are in the house.
    But this ginger toddy would be awesome with more snow in the forecast for tonight.

    Reply
  9. Kathryn

    I love the idea of this book + this recipe. Simplicity at its finest. Happy happy holidays to you and Gabe and all of your family xo

    Reply
  10. Laura Dembowski

    Congratulations on all your big announcements! This tea sounds absolutely heavenly and perfect for this time of year. Can’t wait to pick up some ginger and try it!

    Reply
  11. El

    It sounds like your super busy- congrats! The drink looks wonderful. Happy Christmas and a joyous New Year to you and yours!

    Reply
  12. Fred

    Delicious, made them last night for my wife. Though you might like to see the photo.
    I guess that I am not authorized to attach a photo.

    Still very good.

    Reply
  13. foodlover365

    Definitely could have used this recipe over the holidays. The name alone has me salivating, and my wife will absolutely love it. It’s on the “to do” list for this week. Thanks!

    Reply
  14. Sarah

    Mmmm
    My aunt introduced this to me a year or two ago, its simply delicious. I’d never thought of adding bourbon before though good idea ;)

    Reply
  15. Kari

    Awsome! Without Bourbon (but added Asian pear sliced) this is an Ancient Asian recipe :-) for cold and cogestion. Asian Pears (which are sold in Asian Market, especially in Korean market. Some Costco carries under the name Japanese Pear).
    These pears are known to take way cogestion. :-)
    Love your recipe with Bourbon, just tried it and already make me feel healthy and warm in this frigid cold weather we are experiencing! Thank you.

    Reply

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